Gutter Press

Writing outside the margins
I write and edit for a living. (Yes, some people still do that.) My work has appeared in Allure, Marie Claire, InStyle, Women's Health and more. I've also held top editing positions at Cosmopolitan, Everyday with Rachael Ray and Martha Stewart's Whole Living. This is where I fight writer's block.
  • August 15, 2014 2:53 pm
  • August 6, 2014 12:09 am
    
May 25, 1969: Elizabeth is an eternal one-night stand. She is my private and personal bought mistress. And lascivious with it. It is impossible to tell you what is consisted in the act of love. Well, I’ll tell you: E is a receiver, a perpetual returner of the ball! 
May 26, 1969: Yesterday’s entry, as any man of discernment can tell at a glance, was written while under the strong influence of several vodkas. If I don’t watch myself, I’ll be lucky to see my late forties.
Richard Burton’s diary

    May 25, 1969: Elizabeth is an eternal one-night stand. She is my private and personal bought mistress. And lascivious with it. It is impossible to tell you what is consisted in the act of love. Well, I’ll tell you: E is a receiver, a perpetual returner of the ball!

    May 26, 1969: Yesterday’s entry, as any man of discernment can tell at a glance, was written while under the strong influence of several vodkas. If I don’t watch myself, I’ll be lucky to see my late forties.

    Richard Burton’s diary

    (Source: bellecs)

  • July 29, 2014 7:36 am
  • June 13, 2014 9:17 am

    visual-poetry:

    »watching words move« by  ivan chermayeff, tom geismar & robert brownjohn (1962)

  • November 14, 2013 5:44 pm

    (Source: diamondheroes)

  • November 14, 2013 5:43 pm
  • July 22, 2013 11:03 pm

    grouchomarxism:

    bleedgold:

    In 1993, The Coca-Cola Company decided they wanted capture the Generation X market by creating a new product that was unslick, cynical and anti-corporate. The result of that effort was OK Soda.

    OK Soda was the brainchild of marketing executive Sergio Zyman, the marketing man behind Coca-Cola’s biggest product flop, New Coke.

    Coca-Cola settled on the name OK after their research revealed that “Coke” was the second most recognizable word in the world, the first was “OK.”

    Brian Lanahan, then-manager of special projects for Coke, told “Time Magazine” that they also went with the name OK because “It underpromises. It doesn’t say, ‘This is the next great thing.’ It’s the flip side of overclaiming.”

    To give the cans and print ads an edgy look, OK Soda featured designs by “alternative” cartoonists Daniel Clowes (“Ghost World”) and Charles Burns (“Black Hole”).

    Zyman created a non-traditional ad campaign in response to perceptions that Gen X’ers were cynical and disillusioned. Capitalizing on it, OK’s slogan was “Things are going to be OK”, and they even set-up a hotline 1-800-I-FEEL-OK.   It even had it’s own “OK Manifesto,” that include statements like “What’s the point of OK? Well, what’s the point of anything?” and “There is no real secret to feeling OK.”

    Despite its national media campaign, OK Soda was only tested in select markets in an attempt to create a buzz and demand. But, it failed to meet sales expectations and was officially discontinued by Coke in 1995.

    Today it occasionally pops up on eBay, where empty cans fetch as much as 25 dollars.

  • July 6, 2013 8:12 am

    sweet-pea-soup:

    mynotsowakinglife:

    tyleroakley:

    “8 New Punctuation Marks We Desperately Need”

    This new punctuation system needs to be implemented immediately! 

    Brilliant

  • February 18, 2013 7:15 pm
    millionsmillions:

Last Friday, the writer Emily Rapp’s three-year-old son Ronan passed away from Tay-Sachs disease. Because Emily is part of the greater Rumpus family, the site is honoring Ronan’s memory by publishing a tribute by her friend Jennifer Pastiloff. They’re also encouraging people to help fight Tay-Sachs disease here. View high resolution

    millionsmillions:

    Last Friday, the writer Emily Rapp’s three-year-old son Ronan passed away from Tay-Sachs disease. Because Emily is part of the greater Rumpus family, the site is honoring Ronan’s memory by publishing a tribute by her friend Jennifer Pastiloff. They’re also encouraging people to help fight Tay-Sachs disease here.

  • December 31, 2012 4:39 pm

    "This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes, when I am certain the reader is rested, I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the cymbals—sounds that say listen to this, it is important."

    — Gary Provost (via qmsd)